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Bjorn Lomborg

Get the facts straight

10 Jul2017

Heat-death hysteria: the wrong reason to fight climate change

Published by New York Post

Politically tinged coverage of summer temperatures offers a lot of heat but not much light. “Deadly heat waves becoming more common due to climate change,” declares CNN. “Extreme heat waves will change how we live. We’re not ready,” warns TIME. Some stories are more sensationalist than others, but there is a common theme: Dangerous heat waves will increase in frequency and ferocity because of global warming. This isn’t fake news. In fact, it’s perfectly true. But these stories reveal a peculiar blind spot in the media’s climate reporting. While “deadly,” “killer,” “extreme” heat waves gain a...

6 Jul2017

Why Trump shouldn’t slash R&D funding

Published by The Boston Globe

President Trump recently hosted “Technology Week” at the White House, focusing on “modernizing government technology and stimulating the technology sector.” Behind this string of photo-ops is the unfortunate reality that Trump’s 2018 budget request has proposed the steepest funding cuts for federal research and development in US history. The proposed budget would reduce funding for the Agricultural Research Service in the Department of Agriculture by 26 percent, which would lead to the closure of 17 research centers.

16 Jun2017

Paris is Not the Solution

Published by Project Syndicate

President Donald Trump’s withdrawal of the United States from the Paris climate agreement leaves the US without a global warming policy. That is alarming. But the world’s response – to double down on the pact in opposition to Trump – should also cause concern. There have been two conflicting responses to Trump’s decision – often heard from the very same person. On one hand, we are told that the move imperils the planet. Former US Vice President Al Gore says that Trump is damaging “humanity’s ability to solve the climate crisis.” Business leader Tom Steyer says the Paris accord is “essential...

16 Jun2017

The Charade of the Paris Treaty

Published by The Wall Street Journal

Environmentalists were aghast when President Donald Trump withdrew the U.S. from the Paris climate treaty, with some declaring that the very survival of our civilization was at stake. But is the Paris accord really all that stands between the planet and the worst of climate change? Certainly not. This is not to deny that President Trump’s announcement was problematic. He failed to acknowledge that global warming is real and wrongly claimed that China and India are the “world’s leading polluters.”

1 Jun2017

A path forward after the Paris climate agreement

Published by The Globe and Mail

Like the Kyoto Protocol before it, the drastically over-hyped Paris climate treaty has fallen victim to political and economic reality. Now that President Donald Trump has officially pulled the United States from the accord, it is time to declare the entire Kyoto-Paris approach to global warming dead and buried. Instead of scrapping over the treaty’s corpse, this is an opportunity to try a new, better and more efficient approach to solving global warming.

1 Jun2017

Donald Trump is right to reject the Paris climate change treaty: It's likely to be a costly failure

Published by The Telegraph

Hours before Donald Trump announced that the US would be quitting the Paris carbon-cutting treaty, UN Secretary General António Guterres took to the President's preferred medium, Twitter, to declare that climate action is “unstoppable”. The clear message, reinforced by leaders from the European Union and China, is that the rest of the world will continue with the Paris Treaty without US involvement. Their resolve is quickly going to smash into three incontrovertible truths.

26 May2017

The World, Energy, and Climate – Purdue Convocations Presidential Lecture Series

Published by Purdue Convocations

Bjorn Lomborg joined Purdue President Mitch Daniels in an hour long discussing the world, energy, and climate. The talk was part of Purdue Convocations presidential lecture series. Initiated in 1902, Purdue Convocations is among the oldest collegiate performing arts presenters in the United States. Each year, Convocations offers the region 30--40 performances of widely varying genres.

19 May2017

Changing the Narrative About Haiti

Published by Project Syndicate

Prioritizing spending alternatives is difficult in every country. But it is especially challenging in Haiti, where, following years of fractious politics, a newly elected government is striving to expand the economy and improve wellbeing while confronting the lingering consequences of the massive 2010 earthquake. Every government has limited funds, but Haiti has an annual budget of just $2 billion, with foreign donors allocating another $1 billion. To put that number into context, the annual budgets of two countries with similar-size populations, the Czech Republic and Sweden, are $74 billion...

24 Apr2017

Making dollars count in Haiti

Published by Boston Globe

In every country, every day, a lot of money is spent by various governments and agencies with the intention of making life better for citizens. In Boston, priorities are set by City Hall, the state, and the federal government — along with a host of privately controlled philanthropic organizations. Just like everywhere, these decisions are driven by both political realities and personal preferences.

19 Apr2017

The Low Cost of Ending Poverty

Published by Project Syndicate

Poverty is humanity’s cruelest affliction. If you are extremely poor, you can’t afford to avoid even the easily curable diseases that cause every sixth human death. Your lungs are likely to be filled with indoor air pollution, because, like 2.7 billion others, you cook and keep warm with fuels like dung and wood – with the same effect as smoking two packs of cigarettes every day. An inadequate diet makes your children grow up physically stunted and impairs their cognitive development, costing 4-8 IQ points on average. Such deprivation leads to profound stress and despair, making it difficult...

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