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Bjorn Lomborg

Get the facts straight

22 Feb2015

Electric car benefits? Just myths

Published by USA Today

It is time to stop our green worship of the electric car. It costs us a fortune, cuts little CO2 and surprisingly kills almost twice the number of people compared with regular gasoline cars.

17 Feb2015

Gender Equality as a Development Goal

Published by Project Syndicate

NEW YORK – Despite progress in many societies, women almost everywhere still suffer from significant levels of discrimination. Even in countries where gender equality has advanced furthest, women are over-represented in lower-paying jobs, under-represented in senior government and business positions, and on the receiving end of most domestic violence.

13 Feb2015

Getting Bang for the Buck on New Development Goals

Published by Inter Press Service

Right now, the United Nations is negotiating one of the world’s potentially most powerful policy documents. It can influence trillions of dollars, pull hundreds of millions out of poverty and hunger, reduce violence and improve education — essentially make the world a better place. But much depends on this being done well.

1 Feb2015

The Alarming Thing About Climate Alarmism

Published by Wall Street Journal

We have to put the omni-present narrative that our climate is changing for the worse in perspective. While some indicators are indeed getting worse, the data shows that others are improving. But the prevalent alarmism in the climate debate prevents us from finding smart smart solutions, and most campaigners focus on very expensive but inefficient policies.

1 Feb2015

The Alarming Thing About Climate Alarmism

Published by The Wall Street Journal

It is an indisputable fact that carbon emissions are rising—and faster than most scientists predicted. But many climate-change alarmists seem to claim that all climate change is worse than expected. This ignores that much of the data are actually encouraging. The latest study from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change found that in the previous 15 years temperatures had risen 0.09 degrees Fahrenheit. The average of all models expected 0.8 degrees. So we’re seeing about 90% less temperature rise than expected.

26 Jan2015

Strengthen Health Systems To Reduce Premature Deaths

Published by Time

Last year, life expectancy on the planet reached 70. This is remarkable progress — just 115 years ago in 1900, life expectancy was around 30. In Roman times, life expectancy was about 22 years. Compared to a century ago, each of us has now been granted more than two lifetimes

26 Jan2015

Strengthen Health Systems To Reduce Premature Deaths

Published by Time

Last year, life expectancy on the planet reached 70. This is remarkable progress — just 115 years ago in 1900, life expectancy was around 30. In Roman times, life expectancy was about 22 years. Compared to a century ago, each of us has now been granted more than two lifetimes.

22 Jan2015

Good Governance: Well-Meaning Slogan Or Desirable Development Goal?

Published by Forbes

Corruption last year cost the world more than one trillion dollars. That is a trillion dollars we can’t use to get better health care, education, food and environment. And corruption is only part of the problem of poor governance – many countries are run ineffectively, lacking accountability, transparency and rule of law.

22 Jan2015

Good Governance: Well-Meaning Slogan Or Desirable Development Goal?

Published by Forbes

Corruption last year cost the world more than one trillion dollars. That is a trillion dollars we can’t use to get better health care, education, food and environment. And corruption is only part of the problem of poor governance – many countries are run ineffectively, lacking accountability, transparency and rule of law. Running countries better would have obvious benefits. It would not only reduce corruption but governments would provide more services the public wants and at better quality. It is also likely that economic growth would increase. In a recent UN survey of seven million people...

19 Jan2015

Ebola kills far fewer than Aids, TB and malaria. What should we prioritise?

Published by The Guardian

Ebola got most of the attention in 2014. It killed about 8,000 people. Meanwhile, over the same period of time about 3.6 million people died from HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis (TB) and malaria. The truth is that despite great progress in healthcare, much of the world is still blighted by preventable disease, with the poorest people suffering the most. The good news is that tackling these diseases turns out to be an extraordinary good investment. The Copenhagen Consen sus Center has just published new studies that show effective, clear strategies and targets that would dramatically reduce the burden...

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