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Bjorn Lomborg

Get the facts straight

10 Oct2018

U.N. Ignores Economics Of Climate

Published by Wall Street Journal

The global economy must be transformed immediately to avoid catastrophic climate damage, a new United Nations report declares. Climate economist William Nordhaus has been made a Nobel laureate. The events are being reported as two parts of the same story, but they reveal the contradictions inherent in climate policy—and why economics matters more than ever. Limiting temperatures to 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit above preindustrial levels, as the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change urges, is economically and practically impossible—as Mr. Nordhaus’s work shows. The IPCC report...

26 Sep2018

Global warming did not cause Hurricane Florence

Published by Fox Business Channel

Copenhagen Consensus Center President Bjorn Lomborg discusses how President Trump didn’t mention climate change during his speech at the United Nations and why global warming isn’t responsible for Hurricane Florence.

25 Sep2018

The Global Cost of Domestic Violence

Published by Project Syndicate

Domestic violence costs the world 25 times more than war and terrorism, according to research conducted by James Fearon of Stanford University and Anke Hoeffler of Oxford University on behalf of the Copenhagen Consensus Center. By looking at different kinds of violence, Fearon and Hoeffler find that the global costs of conflict – including the economic toll of deaths from wars and terrorism, refugee-related outlays, and general pecuniary damage – add up to around 0.2% of global GDP each year.

24 Sep2018

The moral and economic case for action to end tuberculosis

Published by The Globe and Mail

This week, heads of state will gather at the United Nations for their first-ever meeting dedicated to ending tuberculosis as a public-health threat. This is expected to result in the adoption of an ambitious political statement. This high-level attention is long overdue, but there is a compelling moral and economic case for this to be matched by resources, which are currently sorely lacking. Over the past two centuries, tuberculosis has caused far more deaths than smallpox, malaria, the plague, influenza, cholera and AIDS combined. This year, the toll from TB surpasses that of HIV/AIDS,...

19 Sep2018

No, global warming isn’t causing worse hurricanes

Published by New York Post

It’s human nature to assign blame for catastrophic events. In medieval times, witches were blamed for weather woes. Trials and burnings increased when weather got worse. In hurricane season today, many find a scapegoat in global warming. Pundits tell us “ignoring the science of climate change will hurt us” (Kristina Ball at NBC) and a Washington Post editorial declares the Trump administration complicit. It’s a familiar drumbeat, recognizable from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Sandy. For years, Al Gore and others emphasized the need to connect extreme weather to climate change to encourage...

18 Sep2018

New evidence highlights huge gains from cheap policy: What Rajasthan and Andhra must do to curb child malnutrition

Published by Times of India

Proper early nutrition can spectacularly change the entire life trajectory of a child. We know from long-term studies that it promotes brain development, making the child do better in school, and much better later in life, affecting everything from the happiness of marriages to the quality of jobs, and up to 60% more earnings. The government has made significant progress in reducing child malnutrition, but with nearly half of all deaths of children aged under five mainly caused by poor diet, much still needs to be done.

26 Aug2018

How the war on climate change slams the world’s poor

Published by New York Post

When a “solution” to a problem causes more damage than the problem, policymaking has gone awry. That’s where we often find ourselves with global warming today. Activist organizations like Worldwatch argue that higher temperatures will make more people hungry, so drastic carbon cuts are needed. But a comprehensive new study published in Nature Climate Change led by researchers from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis has found that strong global climate action would cause far more hunger and food insecurity than climate change itself.

16 Aug2018

A Better World Is Here

Published by Project Syndicate

It’s very easy to form the view that the modern world is coming apart. We are constantly confronted with an onslaught of negativity: frightening headlines, alarming research findings, and miserable statistics. There are indeed many things on the planet that we should be greatly concerned about. But fixating on horror stories means that we miss the bigger picture. The United Nations focuses on three categories of development: social, economic, and environmental. In each category, looking back over the last quarter-century, we have far more reason for cheer than fear. Indeed, this period has...

1 Aug2018

Improving state finances by reducing power losses

Published by Mint

Inadequate and poor-quality power supply means frequent interruptions, poor voltage levels, and dissatisfied consumers across much of the country. Adding up all the losses in the system—including the losses due to energy dissipated in conductors, transformers and other equipment, along with pilferage by those who bypass meters, and losses from failure to recover the amount billed to consumers—India’s total energy losses came to 24% in 2015-16, significantly more than international norms. This, however, is an improvement on 2003-04 when the losses were 38%. Progress was made because of...

18 Jul2018

Let There Be More Than Light

Published by Project Syndicate

For the well-off in both rich and poor countries around the world, lives are enriched by plentiful access to energy that provides light, fresh food, and clean water, and that powers technology and allows the ability to control the temperature. Abundant energy provides the same life-transforming labor as hundreds of servants: Without a refrigerator, we would need to locate fresh food daily, store shelves would be half-empty, and a lot of food would go bad before we could eat it – one reason why, in 1930, stomach cancer was the leading cancer in the United States. Without synthetic fertilizer,...

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