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Bjorn Lomborg

Get the facts straight

9 Feb2021

Biden’s climate ‘fix’ is fantastically expensive and perfectly useless

Published by New York Post

Across the world, politicians are going out of their way to promise fantastically expensive climate policies. President Biden has promised to spend $500 billion each year on climate — about 13 percent of the entire federal revenue. The European Union will spend 25 percent of its budget on climate. Most rich countries now promise to go carbon-neutral by mid-century. Shockingly, only one country has made a serious, independent estimate of the cost: New Zealand found it would optimistically cost 16 percent of its GDP by then, equivalent to the entire current New Zealand budget.

21 Jan2021

Digitisation, best way forward

Published by The Daily Graphic

Of course, no government, no matter how rich or powerful, can do all things. Even President Akufo-Addo will have to prioritise which policy areas his second term will focus on. But digitisation is an excellent place to start. Digitisation can help streamline bureaucracy and cut down waiting time and uncertainty for ordinary citizens when applying for a passport, selling or buying property, or setting up a new business. It can help reduce the inefficiencies and, with less human involvement, diminish opportunities for corruption. By making government work better, digitisation can definitely...

15 Jan2021

Joe Biden’s climate-change plans will burn billions, won’t bring change we actually need

Published by New York Post

Joe Biden will rejoin the Paris climate agreement soon after being inaugurated as president of the United States. Climate change, according to Biden, is “an existential threat” to the nation, and to combat it, he proposes to spend $500 billion each year on climate policies — the equivalent of $1,500 per person.

17 Dec2020

How a modest investment could save 162,000 women a year from dying from childbirth

Published by Los Angeles Times

Every two minutes, a woman dies of complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Most of these deaths are preventable — and the world has been working on a solution for decades. The problem is the funds dedicated to solving the problem never go far enough. There are inexpensive and effective solutions that could help bring down the number of mothers who die from childbirth. A new analysis published last week by Copenhagen Consensus, the think tank I lead, shows how a modest investment of less than $3 billion a year could avert 162,000 maternal deaths,...

21 Nov2020

Rich world’s drive to electric cars gets us nowhere

Published by The Australian

The electric car industry is elated with an incoming Biden administration because it promises to extend and increase electric car subsidies to fix climate change. Similarly, leaders across the rich world promise lavish carrots along with sticks to outlaw petrol cars. This week, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2030. Unfortunately, electric cars will achieve only tiny emissions savings at a very high price. Electric cars are certainly fun, but almost everywhere cost more across their lifetime than their petrol counterparts...

17 Nov2020

Electric cars are good fun for wealthy virtue signallers, but a dreadful way to save the planet

Published by The Telegraph

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson just announced a ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2030 in an attempt to jump-start the market for electric cars in the UK. Bjorn Lomborg cautions in Britain's largest-circulating broadsheet newspaper The Telegraph that electric cars won't be a miracle cure for climate change, as they provide only marginal emission reductions at a very high cost.

9 Nov2020

The smartest solutions for Ghana’s future development

Published by The Daily Graphic

No country, however prosperous, can do everything. Although Ghana’s ongoing election campaign includes lots of additional promises, there are limits to what can be funded with the available resources. That is why it is crucial that every cedi is spent in the best possible way. To achieve that goal, the Ghana Priorities project for over a year has worked with 28 teams of specialist economists from Ghana and abroad to study the costs and benefits of 80 concrete policy solutions to improve the future of the country. For instance, education economists have analyzed the best education solutions...

13 Oct2020

The good and bad of Joe Biden’s $2 trillion climate change plan

Published by Los Angeles Daily News

Promising to spend $2 trillion on climate over the next four years, U.S. presidential candidate Joe Biden is taking a path similar to that of politicians from many other rich countries, vowing costly policies to help address global warming. Along with his fellow Democrats, he pledges to end fossil fuels in the power sector by 2035 and cut net U.S. emissions to zero by 2050. Global warming is a real problem we need to tackle smartly. President Donald Trump has incorrectly suggested that climate change is a hoax and has offered almost no effective climate policy. Better approaches are...

1 Oct2020

Did you hear the one about California fighting wildfires by banning gasoline cars?

Published by Dallas Morning News

California Gov. Gavin Newsom made headlines by signing an executive order Wednesday banning the future sale of new gasoline-powered cars and trucks. In the wake of the devastating California fires, he said more ambitious steps are needed to reduce climate change. Banning gas transport, he said in a statement, “is the most impactful step our state can take to fight climate change.” Poetically, he stressed that “our cars shouldn’t make wildfires worse.” While the governor is correct that climate change is a real problem that we should fix smartly, most of his analysis is seriously flawed, and...

30 Sep2020

Boosting Ghana’s Industry for Sustained Growth

Published by The Daily Graphic

Ghana's economic growth has been rapid since the start of the new millennium, reaching 14% in 2011, but economic performance has been relatively lower since then, particularly from 2013-2016. Important factors for the slowing of development are the huge infrastructural deficit and the limited fiscal space, but Ghana has the potential for improvement thanks to its large natural resource deposits. The country has historically relied on the extraction of these abundant resources for economic and social development, and global business attention has focused on several sectors, including oil and...

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