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Bjorn Lomborg

Get the facts straight

16 Jun2017

The Charade of the Paris Treaty

Published by The Wall Street Journal

Environmentalists were aghast when President Donald Trump withdrew the U.S. from the Paris climate treaty, with some declaring that the very survival of our civilization was at stake. But is the Paris accord really all that stands between the planet and the worst of climate change? Certainly not. This is not to deny that President Trump’s announcement was problematic. He failed to acknowledge that global warming is real and wrongly claimed that China and India are the “world’s leading polluters.”

1 Jun2017

A path forward after the Paris climate agreement

Published by The Globe and Mail

Like the Kyoto Protocol before it, the drastically over-hyped Paris climate treaty has fallen victim to political and economic reality. Now that President Donald Trump has officially pulled the United States from the accord, it is time to declare the entire Kyoto-Paris approach to global warming dead and buried. Instead of scrapping over the treaty’s corpse, this is an opportunity to try a new, better and more efficient approach to solving global warming.

1 Jun2017

Donald Trump is right to reject the Paris climate change treaty: It's likely to be a costly failure

Published by The Telegraph

Hours before Donald Trump announced that the US would be quitting the Paris carbon-cutting treaty, UN Secretary General António Guterres took to the President's preferred medium, Twitter, to declare that climate action is “unstoppable”. The clear message, reinforced by leaders from the European Union and China, is that the rest of the world will continue with the Paris Treaty without US involvement. Their resolve is quickly going to smash into three incontrovertible truths.

26 May2017

The World, Energy, and Climate – Purdue Convocations Presidential Lecture Series

Published by Purdue Convocations

Bjorn Lomborg joined Purdue President Mitch Daniels in an hour long discussing the world, energy, and climate. The talk was part of Purdue Convocations presidential lecture series. Initiated in 1902, Purdue Convocations is among the oldest collegiate performing arts presenters in the United States. Each year, Convocations offers the region 30--40 performances of widely varying genres.

19 May2017

Changing the Narrative About Haiti

Published by Project Syndicate

Prioritizing spending alternatives is difficult in every country. But it is especially challenging in Haiti, where, following years of fractious politics, a newly elected government is striving to expand the economy and improve wellbeing while confronting the lingering consequences of the massive 2010 earthquake. Every government has limited funds, but Haiti has an annual budget of just $2 billion, with foreign donors allocating another $1 billion. To put that number into context, the annual budgets of two countries with similar-size populations, the Czech Republic and Sweden, are $74 billion...

24 Apr2017

Making dollars count in Haiti

Published by Boston Globe

In every country, every day, a lot of money is spent by various governments and agencies with the intention of making life better for citizens. In Boston, priorities are set by City Hall, the state, and the federal government — along with a host of privately controlled philanthropic organizations. Just like everywhere, these decisions are driven by both political realities and personal preferences.

19 Apr2017

The Low Cost of Ending Poverty

Published by Project Syndicate

Poverty is humanity’s cruelest affliction. If you are extremely poor, you can’t afford to avoid even the easily curable diseases that cause every sixth human death. Your lungs are likely to be filled with indoor air pollution, because, like 2.7 billion others, you cook and keep warm with fuels like dung and wood – with the same effect as smoking two packs of cigarettes every day. An inadequate diet makes your children grow up physically stunted and impairs their cognitive development, costing 4-8 IQ points on average. Such deprivation leads to profound stress and despair, making it difficult...

19 Apr2017

Admitting what we don't know how to fix

Published by China Daily

What are the biggest problems facing humanity? A lack of education and opportunity, poverty, inequality, violence and war, and environmental degradation. These are the areas where trillions of dollars are spent in well-meaning efforts by governments and donors each year. But agreeing that a problem exists is not the same as knowing how to fix it. When it comes to development spending and philanthropy, it is too easy for money to be wasted - and opportunities missed - because this important distinction is ignored.

5 Apr2017

The flawed thinking at the heart of the renewable energy swindle

Published by The Spectator

A new report revealing that using wood pellets to generate electricity can actually speed up global warming should be the final nail in the coffin for the flawed policy of biomass subsidies. Policies designed to incentivise green energy use are not only having a dubious effect on climate change, they are destroying biodiversity and even killing many thousands of people.

29 Mar2017

Trump cuts show Paris treaty is a paper tiger: Bjorn Lomborg

Published by USA Today

President Trump’s executive order eliminating President Obama’s standards for power plants guts the main U.S. measure to reduce harmful carbon emissions, and in doing so reveals the emptiness of the Paris climate treaty. The science is clear-cut: Climate change is real and mostly caused by humanity. Obama committed America to major carbon cuts. According to the International Energy Agency, the U.S. promised to cut more energy-related CO2 emissions than any country in the world from 2013 to 2025, under the Paris climate treaty.

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