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Bjorn Lomborg

Get the facts straight

22 Sep2017

The Economist Caught Between Climate Deniers and Alarmists

Published by WNYC's The Takeaway

"Climate change has been a key issue at the United Nations General Assembly this week. Meetings at the U.N. about the topic have been taking place during a season of calamitous weather events, including a series of devastating hurricanes. While he believes that world leaders cannot ignore climate change, Bjorn Lomborg, president of the Copenhagen Consensus Center, says he is concerned that precious resources are too often squandered on ineffective solutions, and that aid money could be spent on better interventions that do the most social good."

22 Sep2017

Climate change is dangerous. That doesn't mean we have to spend money stupidly.

Published by USA Today

This is what global warming looks like, opinion pieces quickly declared in both Politico and CNN about devastating Hurricane Harvey. A week later, news media around the globe and politicians were saying the exact same thing about Hurricane Irma. Jumping the gun on linking disasters to climate change is dangerous. It points us toward policies that will have little to no effect at reducing future devastation. The science is clear but also nuanced: Climate change will worsen some extreme weather events, and it will improve others.

18 Sep2017

Empowering Girls

Published by Project Syndicate

In the lottery of life, being born female in a poor country places one at a double disadvantage. Women in poor countries have the highest global incidence of poverty of any demographic group, along with the worst health conditions, the least access to education, and the highest likelihood of being victims of violence. Gender inequality – through workplace exclusion and lower pay – costs the world a staggering 15.5% of GDP. Denying women opportunities to develop their potential means that societies forego their contribution. Yet the frustrating reality is that effective solutions to address...

8 Sep2017

Don’t link climate change to increasing costs of disasters

Published by Hindustan Times

While the world focuses on the devastating storms in South Asia and the US, it is timely to ask ourselves two broad, related questions. First, how do we prevent such disasters from being so devastating in the future? And second, how do we best help the vulnerable people who are most affected? When big weather events happen, often the first thing talked about is climate change. Perhaps it’s a matter of trying to pin blame for a natural disaster. “South Asia is also suffering the horrors of climate change” was one recent American headline. This claim has some justification, but ultimately...

7 Sep2017

The Climate-Change Distraction

Published by The Wall Street Journal

Climate change has been blamed for a dizzying array of absurd woes, from the dwindling number of customers at Bulgarian brothels to the death of the Loch Ness monster. Most of us can see through these silly headlines, but it’s far harder to parse the more serious claims when they’re repeated in good faith by well-meaning campaigners. Consider the recent assertion by Unicef’s Bangladesh head of mission that climate change leads to an increase in child marriages. Between 2011 and 2020 globally, more than 140 million girls under the age of 18 will become brides, leading to curtailed education...

30 Aug2017

After Harvey: Are record-breaking storms the new normal?

Published by France 24

In order to help future victims of hurricanes, focusing on climate change is the most expensive way to help the fewest people. Instead, we should focus on better infrastructure, porous surfaces, drainage, levees and dams, better building codes, and better zoning, as Lomborg explains on France24.

30 Aug2017

The Economist asks: Bjorn Lomborg

Published by The Economist Asks

Bjorn Lomborg joined The Economist's podcast The Economist asks to discuss the question: "Poverty, health, education or climate change: where should governments spend their money?" Within each of these areas, some solutions are better than others: shouldn't we do the smart ones first?

26 Aug2017

How alarmist rhetoric warps climate policy

Published by The Australian

Promoting his climate change film An Inconvenient Sequel, former US vice-president Al Gore likes to say that the nightly news has become “a nature hike through the Book of Revelations”. He’s not the only one touting an apocalypse. In a much-shared story, New York magazine warned that famine, economic collapse and “a sun that cooks us” will happen as soon as the end of this century, as “parts of the Earth will likely become uninhabitable, and other parts horrifically inhospitable”.

24 Aug2017

La comida ecológica, hasta 660 euros más cara al año

Published by El Comercio

La nutricionista Rocío Pastor enumera los pros y contras de un estilo de vida que «comenzó con la cultura hippie» y que ahora «tiene un público con un nivel económico medio-alto». Los productos ecológicos son alimentos que no presentan ninguna alteración genética. Se cultivan respetando la naturaleza. No utilizan pesticidas, fungicidas o productos químicos. Por moda, por concienciación medio ambiental o por salud, «cada vez más gente se une a esta corriente», según cuenta la nutricionista Rocío Pastor. Un estilo de vida que ha evolucionado desde su auge en los años 70, gracias al movimiento...

22 Aug2017

Aprender com a malária

Published by Los Negócios

Num mundo onde não há falta de boas causas, fazer o melhor bem possível exige que nos concentremos nas melhores oportunidades primeiro. É uma das melhores histórias não contadas nos anais do desenvolvimento: foram feitos grandes avanços contra a malária, uma doença outrora endémica em todo o mundo e que, mais recentemente, continua a ser um flagelo nos países em desenvolvimento. Ao longo dos últimos 15 anos, foram salvos mais de seis milhões de vidas. Melhor ainda, as lições desse sucesso podem – e devem - ser aplicadas a outros grandes desafios do desenvolvimento. A malária é provocada por...

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