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Bjorn Lomborg

Get the facts straight

7 Dec2015

What's The Price Tag Of Paris' Climate Summit? Don't Ask The Politicians

Published by Forbes

When you go shopping – whether at the corner store, or at the ritzy Galeries Lafayette or Printemps here in Paris – you expect to know what you’re spending and what you’re getting. Strangely, when it comes to global climate treaties, our politicians like to commit to hugely expensive policies without even acknowledging that they come with a price tag...

7 Dec2015

Climate aid is a poor response to global challenges

Published by The Age

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull's diversion of $1 billion of development funds to climate aid might please climate activists at the Paris summit, but it's one of the least effective ways of helping the world's poor. What would help is support for an end to the $680 billion wasted on annual fossil fuel subsidies that not only increase CO₂ but suck dry the public purse in many developing countries, keeping funds from areas that need it. In diverting money to climate aid, Turnbull joins US President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping, who will each invest $4.15 billion ($...

4 Dec2015

What Will All The Hot Air In Paris Actually Do?

Published by Forbes

Negotiators and activists are getting increasingly serious about the prospects of finalizing a carbon-cutting deal here in Paris. No doubt if they are successful we will see much back-slapping and exhortations of "success" in 7 days. But the bonhomie will hide a rather inconvenient truth: even if it’s successful, any deal negotiated in Paris is going to do very little to rein in temperature rises. In a recent peer-reviewed research paper, I looked at all the carbon-cutting promises countries committed to ahead of Paris (their so-called “Intended Nationally Determined...

3 Dec2015

Europe's Biggest Protest--But Not The World's Top Priority

Published by Forbes

There is not one single climate activist in sight here at the climate summit venue in Le Bourget on the outskirts of Paris. Understandably, the area is effectively sealed off so there’s not much of an audience. While many planned marches have been cancelled for security reasons, there are still many protestors in the media and elsewhere, who are passionately pushing those inside the climate talks to push for a more drastic treaty...

3 Dec2015

Mark Zuckerberg's billion-dollar chance to change the world

Published by Telegraph

The decision by Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and wife Priscilla Chan to use 99% of their Facebook shares to fund charitable initiatives over their lives is an overwhelming statement of generosity. The massive challenge for the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative will be how to achieve the most good with this money. Individual philanthropists play a vital role in development, not least because – unlike political initiatives or groups dependent on fundraising – billionaires can afford to ignore lobby groups and popular attention...

2 Dec2015

Paris Needs To Take The 'Climate' Out Of 'Climate Aid'

Published by Forbes

One of the things we’re hearing more and more about here in Paris is so-called “climate aid.” There has been a huge push from climate NGOs to convince rich countries to spend a fortune to help poor countries adjust to global warming. This term is a catch-all for money being given from rich countries to poorer countries for global warming education, solar panels, adaptation, or anything you can imagine that can be linked to global warming. This push has already had an effect. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has analyzed about 70% of total global...

1 Dec2015

What Would It Take For The Paris Climate Summit To Succeed?

Published by Forbes

There’s a lot of focus now on the politics of Paris. Will poor countries get the "climate aid" they want? Will China agree to reduce its growth, leaving millions more in poverty, by committing to far-reaching carbon cuts? What will be the wording of the treaty that emerges? It’s easy to become cynical. Let’s instead take a step back and ask a much more interesting question: what would it take for Paris to succeed? By this, I don’t mean that the delegates manage to sign some kind of treaty. I mean, what would it take for Paris to have a real impact on climate...

30 Nov2015

Is Climate Change Our Biggest Problem?

Published by PragerU

Is man-made climate change our biggest problem? Are the wildfires, droughts and hurricanes we see on the news an omen of even worse things to come? The United Nations and many political leaders think so and want to spend trillions of tax dollars to reverse the warming trend. Are they right? Will the enormous cost justify the gain? Economist Bjorn Lomborg, director of the Copenhagen Consensus Center, explains the key issues and reaches some sobering conclusions.

30 Nov2015

The Paris Climate Summit Will Fail, For A Pretty Simple Reason

Published by Forbes

If you don’t learn from history, you’re bound to repeat it. Here in Saint-Denis, northern Paris, a history lesson is sorely needed. Thousands are gathering here for the 21st international global warming meeting. Hotels are already near-full, broadcasters are setting up, protestors are preparing to roar. All because this summit is "the last chance" to avert dangerous temperature rises, if we listen to the Earth League or a bunch of others. It’s going to be "too late" if a meaningful treaty isn’t negotiated here in the next few days, says the French...

23 Nov2015

Blowing hot air: Governmental carbon-cutting promises are inadequate

Published by Hindustan Times

Paris will soon host the 21st global climate conference (November 30-December 11) — and environmentalists have high hopes that this time, negotiators will agree on a carbon-cutting treaty. In 20 years there have been a few highs such as a treaty negotiated in Kyoto in 1997 and many lows like the political chaos and disappointment of Copenhagen in 2009. There has been one constant: despite all the talk, there has been no real impact on temperature rises. The Kyoto Protocol fell apart, and the only significant global carbon cuts have come from economic downturns, not international pacts...

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