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Bjorn Lomborg

Get the facts straight

17 Jan2017

Oxfam's upside down inequality study

Published by USA Today

Today there is a commonplace — and wrong — impression that inequality is inexorably rising. Oxfam just contributed to the misunderstanding by claiming that the richest eight people own the same amount as half the world’s population. Oxfam measures net wealth, not income. Crucially, it includes ‘negative’ wealth, meaning the 5% of Americans with student loans or negative equity in their houses are considered among the world’s poorest — poorer than three-quarters of all Africans. This means that even the most impoverished soul you could imagine —...

10 Jan2017

A Digital Strategy for Bangladesh’s Biggest Problems

Published by Wall Street Journal

Bangladesh halved its poverty rate and grew its economy by as much as 7% in recent years. Yet many challenges remain, from malnourishment in rural districts to air pollution in the capital Dhaka. To help the government tackle the nation’s biggest problems, the Bangladesh Priorities Project asked scores of economists how best to respond. This collaboration between the Copenhagen Consensus Center think tank and BRAC, the world’s largest nongovernmental organization, saw an eminent panel of Bangladeshi thought leaders and a Nobel laureate economist rank 76 proposals. The list...

30 Dec2016

Feeding infants well starts a virtuous circle

Published by Hindustan Times

The first-ever national survey to measure child nutrition levels is an excellent and timely endeavour that will help India to tackle one of its biggest challenges to development. The survey by UNICEF and the government will quantify micronutrient deficiencies as well as worm infestation. Both children and adults need a high quality diet, but feeding young children well makes a big difference for their lives. The first 1,000 days of a child’s life – from conception to the age of two – are vital for proper development...

26 Dec2016

Was 2016 the Best Year Ever?

Published by Project Syndicate

According to popular wisdom, 2016 was a terrible year. Horrific terror attacks struck many countries. The Syrian crisis claimed tens of thousands of lives. Turkey withstood suicide bombings and a failed coup. More than 70 countries experienced a decline in freedom. Political shocks included Brexit and Donald Trump’s victory in the United States’ presidential election – both unforeseen by the media or political elite. Zika was declared an international public-health emergency. The year is likely to be the warmest ever measured. Reading the opinion pages, there is a sense that...

23 Dec2016

China’s thriving pandas are proof that economic growth is good for the environment

Published by South China Morning Post

Giant pandas are among the world’s favourite creatures, becoming viral video sensations simply for sneezing or rolling around cutely. In a year with seemingly little cheer at times, there was good news for all who love the bears. That came when the International Union for Conservation of Nature ­removed them from the endangered species list – reducing their threat status to “vulnerable”. Perils facing iconic animals like these have often been used by environmental campaigners to deliver an alarming message: the planet is going to hell in a handbasket. We shouldn...

15 Dec2016

Green energy a real solution to climate change

Published by China Daily

Thanks to the election of Donald Trump as the next United States president, diplomats and governments around the world are wondering what to expect from the next four years. When it comes to climate change, many environmental campaigners are alarmed, which is understandable because Trump has sent mixed signals and the world does not know anything about the incoming US administration's plans in other areas. But there could be cause for hope, and even a potential opportunity for China. Climate change is real and mostly man-made. On the presidential campaign, Trump said he would dump the...

12 Dec2016

Don’t blame climate change for extreme weather

Published by Boston Globe

Climate change means more extreme weather: This is a simple, powerful claim that has been pounded into our consciousness for a decade. From Greenpeace to President Obama to Scientific American, scarcely a weather event happens without someone pointing the finger at global warming and calling for action. But there are big problems with this simple statement, which are exposed starkly in recent peer-reviewed analysis in the journal Weather, Climate and Society by University of Manchester scientists Vladimir Jankovic and David M. Schultz.

10 Dec2016

India, Trump and climate change: There may be unexpected opportunities that lie ahead

Published by Times of India

The unexpected election of President Donald Trump has prompted diplomats and governments around the world to question what to expect from the next four years. When it comes to climate change, many environmental campaigners are alarmed. This is understandable: Trump has sent mixed signals, and we have much to learn about the new administration’s plans. But there is cause for hope, and even a potential opportunity for India...

22 Nov2016

Trump’s climate plan might not be so bad after all

Published by The Washington Post

The election of Donald Trump and Republican majorities in both houses have terrified environmentalists and climate campaigners, who have declared that the next four years will be a “disaster.” Fear is understandable. We have much to learn about the new administration’s plans. But perhaps surprisingly, what little we know offers some cause for hope. It should not need to be restated in 2016 that climate change is real and mostly man-made. It is hard to know whether Trump will acknowledge this. He has called global warming a “hoax” perpetrated by the Chinese, but...

22 Nov2016

The Paris agreement was never the solution to climate change

Published by CAPX

Announced with much fanfare 11 months ago, the Paris Climate Treaty finally came into force earlier this month – just in time for the election of Donald Trump to potentially render the whole thing moot. But there’s a bigger problem for climate campaigners than Trump. It’s that the Paris Treaty will in any case have very little effect on temperature change. It promises to keep temperature rises below 2C. But there is no way any of the Paris promises will get anywhere close to achieving this...

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