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Bjorn Lomborg

Get the facts straight

22 Jan2010

Book review about Global Crises, Global Solutions

Published by Oxford Prospect

By Nicholas Newman, Oxford Prospect. Increasingly, we are hearing the term that something must be done to solve the world’s almost never-ending ending crises. The media is full of pressing appeals that every problem is urgent and must be tackled immediately, with often little regard to the economic and social costs involved. Unfortunately, for policy makers, the real world of geopolitics and budgetary issues forces politicians to prioritise decisions. Often such policy decisions will be both tough to make and politically unpopular with the public at large. This book is designed as a set...

15 Jan2010

Lomborg in Hindustan Times

Published by Hindustan Times

6)Star Statistician: Bjorn Lomborg Why: He would have appeared on CNN’s “Larry King Live” by the time you read this. In the run up to Copenhagen, the professor at the Copenhagen Business School has written for Time, Newsweek and the Hindustan Times, and his views are sought by everyone from the Economist to the government of Mali, which wants him to advise them on how to spend money they might receive to tackle the effects of climate change. So the Playstation addict and author of two books (“Have you played Uncharted 2?” he asks a HT reporter, who hasn’t)...

11 Jan2010

Lomborg's Skeptical Enviromentalist is among TOP 50 SUSTAINABILITY BOOKS

This unique title draws together in one volume some of the best thinking to date on the pressing social, environmental and ethical challenges we face as a society. These are the Top 50 Sustainability Books as voted for by the University of Cambridge Programme for Sustainability Leadership’s alumni network of over 2,000 senior leaders from around the world. In addition to profiles of all 50 titles, many of the authors share their most recent reflections on the state of the world and the ongoing attempts by business, government and civil society to create a more sustainable future...

23 Dec2009

Financial Times: We should change tack on climate after Copenhagen

Published by Financial Times

By Bjorn Lomborg Published: December 23 2009 After 12 days of protests, posturing and seemingly endless palaver, the elephantine gath ering that was the Copen-hagen climate summit has laboured mightily and brought forth . . . a mouse. As vague as it is toothless, the accord on curbing greenhouse gas emissions that emerged from the Bella Centre this weekend imposes no real obligations, sets no binding emissions targets and requires no specific actions by anyone. (...)

15 Dec2009

Lomborg on NPR

Published by NPR

Economically Speaking Is Climate Change A Priority? by DAVID KESTENBAUM December 15, 2009 Bjorn Lomborg, author of The Skeptical Environmentalist, is roaming the halls of the U.N. climate talks in Copenhagen. While Lomborg believes climate change is real, he thinks the approach being taken to fight it is doomed to failure. Lomborg also famously led a team of economists who ranked climate change low on a list of priorities when compared to things like combating disease. Needless to say, Lomborg is not a popular figure at the talks. Listen to the interview online

9 Dec2009

Global Warming and Mt. Kilimanjaro

Published by Wall Street Journal

Global Warming and Mt. Kilimanjaro The glaciers on the famous peak, receding for more than a century, attract many tourists; the people of Tanzania attract much less attention. By BJORN LOMBORG Climate change has captured the attention of politicians around the world. The following article is part of a series, leading up to the United Nations conference on global warming in Copenhagen that starts this week, on how ordinary people in different countries view the issue: Every year, more than 10,000 tourists are drawn to Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, driven in no small part by the fear that the...

9 Dec2009

Climate Change and Melting Glaciers

Published by Wall Street Journal

Climate Change and Melting Glaciers Nepal's poor have more pressing problems. By BJORN LOMBORG Global warming has captured the attention of politicians around the world. The following article is part of a series leading up to the December United Nations conference in Copenhagen on how ordinary people in different countries view the issue: Nine years ago, Maya Bishwokarma moved with her family to Kathmandu from Trisuli, a remote village in the hilly Nepal countryside. Their search for a better life has proved elusive. She and her husband and two sons live in a small, two-room house with...

9 Dec2009

Cyclones and Global Warming

Published by The Wall Street Journal

NOVEMBER 22, 2009, Wall Street Journal Cyclones and Global Warming: A survivor in India says carbon cuts won't help. By BJØRN LOMBORG Global warming has captured the attention of politicians around the world. The following article is part of a series leading up to the December United Nations conference in Copenhagen on how ordinary people in different countries view the issue: One week after Cyclone Aila flattened Lakshmi Bera's mud, bamboo and thatched grass house in May, a Copenhagen Consensus researcher found her family of five under the open sky. Their only protection was a...

30 Nov2009

Lomborg: Under heat, climate-change contrarian won't wilt

Published by The Globe and Mail

Interview with Bjorn Lomborg. John Allemang From Saturday's Globe and Mail Published on Friday, Nov. 27 2009 Under heat, climate-change contrarian won't wilt. The controversial Bjorn Lomborg doesn't deny global warming. But he believes it's ‘an incredibly bad deal' to spend so much money on cutting carbon emissions, he tells John Allemang. Former Danish statistics professor Bjorn Lomborg created a storm of controversy when he published The Skeptical Environmentalist , a 1998 work that was denounced by scientists for its cost-benefit critique of the Kyoto Protocol but...

18 Nov2009

Global Warming as Seen From Bangladesh

Published by Wall Street Journal

Wall Street Journal. BJØRN LOMBORG, Nov 9 2009. Global Warming as Seen From Bangladesh The following article is part of a series leading up to the December United Nations conference in Copenhagen on how ordinary people in different countries view global warming. When the monsoon rains come, Momota Begum and her husband and children must take turns sleeping in their tiny concrete house's one bed to escape the waste and human excrement that can wash in from outside. They live in a three-decade old refugee camp in Dhaka, Bangladesh. It is run for Urdu-speaking people who found themselves on...

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