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Bjorn Lomborg

Get the facts straight

26 May2017

The World, Energy, and Climate – Purdue Convocations Presidential Lecture Series

Published by Purdue Convocations

Bjorn Lomborg joined Purdue President Mitch Daniels in an hour long discussing the world, energy, and climate. The talk was part of Purdue Convocations presidential lecture series. Initiated in 1902, Purdue Convocations is among the oldest collegiate performing arts presenters in the United States. Each year, Convocations offers the region 30--40 performances of widely varying genres.

24 May2017

A Menu of Options to Improve Public Services in Haiti

Published by The Huffington Post

Many proposals have been made in the past ten years to make Haiti’s public sector more effective. In spite of these efforts, public services remain in a critical state, illustrated by strikes, delays caused by red tape, and difficulties for citizens to do things like getting a passport, registering land, or clearing customs for imported goods. The improvement of public services continues to pose a challenge for Haiti. New research for Haiti Priorise, a research project that examines solutions to the nation’s biggest challenges, by economist Riphard Serent from Quisqueya University and the...

19 May2017

Changing the Narrative About Haiti

Published by Project Syndicate

Prioritizing spending alternatives is difficult in every country. But it is especially challenging in Haiti, where, following years of fractious politics, a newly elected government is striving to expand the economy and improve wellbeing while confronting the lingering consequences of the massive 2010 earthquake. Every government has limited funds, but Haiti has an annual budget of just $2 billion, with foreign donors allocating another $1 billion. To put that number into context, the annual budgets of two countries with similar-size populations, the Czech Republic and Sweden, are $74 billion...

17 May2017

The Phenomenal Benefits of Improving Mother and Child Nutrition

Published by The Huffington Post

A tablet that costs less than 5 gourdes (or US$0.08) could end up saving more than 15,000 Haitian lives over the next 12 years, according to new research for Haiti Priorise. Haiti Priorise is a research project in which experts study the costs and effects of different approaches to solving Haitian challenges, from education and economic initiatives to environmental ones. Some of the highest returns on investment are those identified by Stephen Vosti of the University of California, Davis, and colleagues, in an examination of Haitian nutrition.

16 May2017

Memo to whoever lands the world’s top health job – do this first

Published by New Scientist

Jobs don’t come much tougher than this. Whoever is chosen as the new head of the World Health Organization next week has $4.5 billion a year to spend – but when you’re trying to improve public health on a planet of 7.5 billion people, you have to use it wisely. So the new director-general needs to prioritise areas where a sharper focus would squeeze the most out of every dollar, yen, euro or pound spent. Doing this would also bolster the case for an increase in the WHO’s budget.

15 May2017

Building Haiti’s Defenses Against Natural Disasters

Published by The Huffington Post

Over the past 21 years, Haiti has been hit by 40 cyclones, thunderstorms and heavy rains. Each year on average two events cause flooding and landslides with serious consequences for people and their livelihoods. Haiti is more vulnerable than many nations because of the number of people living in poverty. Climate change means that these phenomena could increase in occurrence and severity.

8 May2017

How Increased Access to Family Planning Can Help Haiti

Published by The Huffington Post

During the 1970s and 1980s, a successful family planning program with strong private and public sector support helped contribute to a decline in Haiti’s fertility rate. Political instability in the 1980s saw the dissolution of the National Family Planning Council, the termination of the family planning outreach project, and support for many sexual and reproductive health services shifted to international organizations. In addition, in the early 1980s, the first cases of HIV infection were diagnosed in Haiti, and by the late 1980s, HIV/AIDS-related funding had overtaken family planning funding...

4 May2017

The Case for Building Roads in Haiti

Published by The Huffington Post

Transport problems affect every aspect of life in Haiti. The problems are all too familiar to Haitians. Roads degrade faster than they are rehabilitated or built. The inadequacy of the road network, combined with the pitiful state of roads and transport vehicles, means a large part of the rural population is isolated. In fact, more than half of these people have no access to transportation, and more than a third rely on roads that are difficult to access. These conditions extremely limit access to basic services and opportunities for economic development.

2 May2017

Justice For All: Reducing Preventive Detention in Haiti

Published by The Huffington Post

All Haitians are equal before the law. So says the Haitian Constitution. But in reality, access to justice can happen at different speeds for different people. One reason is the lack of judges. During 2014-2015, there were just 63 trial judges for 8,046 people awaiting trial. Added to this fact, there is a lack of resources to properly operate the judicial and the prison systems. And, according to testimonies and expressions of public sentiment, corruption affects all levels of the judicial system.

28 Apr2017

Early Childhood Education: an Investment in Haiti’s Future

Published by The Huffington Post

Investment in education is essential for Haiti to lift incomes and fight poverty. But in this area like every other, decision-makers face many options. How can limited resources be spent to achieve the most possible? That is a question that the research project Haiti Priorise sets out to answer. The Copenhagen Consensus is publishing new research papers written by education economists on crucial topics including building more schools, developing teachers, teaching in Creole instead of French, and providing scholarships to keep girls in school.

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